The most painful archaeological discoveries

The most painful archaeological discoveries

31 Aug2019
The most painful archaeological discoveries

One of the most painful archaeological discoveries this year took place in Pompeii, where archaeologists found the human remains of an individual fleeing the Vesuvius volcano in Pompeii, but died of a large rock that fell on his head. At first the people of Pompeii were thought to have been killed by volcanic gases, but other studies have shown that they died because of high temperatures. Others, based on letters written five years after the incident, concluded that people were strangled because of the volcanic ash. After the volcano, the city was buried under four to six meters of soil and ash for five years, and was discovered by chance in the year 6 BC. This historic city, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, is one of Italy's most important attractions with more than 2.5 million visitors a year.
 

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